You are here

Publications & Research

Publications & Research

We provide a platform between researchers, disaster practitioners, healthcare professionals and students for expertise exchange, collaboration and policy discussion.

Publications & Research

The HKJCDPRI Publications Section contains collaborative researches and publications with our partners and renowned academic institutions, and other research and development projects related to disaster preparedness and response.

The Guidelines section contains our selected collection of technical information, operational guidelines and useful tools for disaster management.

The Blog sub-section provides a platform where our team and peers share news and updates, as well as opinions and experiences in building disaster preparedness for the communities.

 

The blog posts are written by the author in his own personal capacity / affiliation stated. The views, thoughts and opinions expressed in the post belong solely to the author and does not necessarily represent those of Hong Kong Jockey Club Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute.

All resources listed here are freely and publicly available, unless specified otherwise. We ask users to use them with respect and credit the authors as appropriate.

2017

26/04/2017
Between 2005 and 2014, disasters have caused total damage of US$1.4 trillion worldwide, with 1.7 billion people affected and 0.7 million killed. With climate change, urbanization, environmental degradation and poverty, the world has been experiencing disasters at a higher frequency and intensity. At the same time, global population is ageing at an unprecedented speed: between 2015 and 2030, the number of persons aged 60 years or over in the world is projected to grow by 56%, from 901 million to more than 1.4 billion. Older people therefore is going to be an increasingly important group, in terms of both their contribution and vulnerabilities, in the face of disasters. This paper discusses the disaster-related health risks of the older people in Hong Kong, and presents key policy recommendations for better protection of this vulnerable group.

2016

29/12/2016
On 8 April 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the newly set up Global Foreign Medical Teams Registry which would enable WHO to build a global roster of foreign medical response teams (FMT) ready to be deployed in sudden onset disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, cyclones, floods, and disease outbreaks.  
21/12/2016
In order to assist the Hong Kong Jockey Club Disaster Preparedness and Response Institute (HKJCDPRI) and other disaster management players in Hong Kong in identifying priority areas for research, training  and  partnerships, HKJCDPRI launched a Scoping Study titled “Disaster Preparedness in Hong Kong – A Scoping Study” to assess the current disaster preparedness situation in Hong Kong. The FXB Centre for Health and Human Rights at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health took the lead in coordination with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, the Emergency Medicine Unit at the University of Hong Kong, and the Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), in undertaking an extensive survey of a whole array of stakeholders in Hong Kong.
13/12/2016
Aiming to provide accessible real-time landslide information to the public and leverage smart technology to ease and enhance landslide incident reporting in Hong Kong, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology will develop a new smart Landslide Information System (LIS), in which will be supported by the HKJCDPRI Research Grant 2016. The project team consisted of three prominent professors including Prof Clarence Choi, Research Assistant Professor from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Principal Investigator), Prof Qian Zhang, Chair Professor from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering and Prof Charles Ng, Chair Professor from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Pages